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Last Saturday I took a day-trip to San Francisco to meet my friend Pamela. Pamela is an amazing collage artist ¬†— one of the most talented that I know. We’ve discovered that we share a similar style, or at least are drawn to similar types of images and illustrations.

We’ve been admiring each other’s work for several months now and knew that if we’d get together we’d have a lot to talk about, so when we made arrangements for me to come up to her studio I was so giddy, I couldn’t resist telling my kids, “Mommy’s got a play-date on Saturday!”

Her workspace is filled with so much inspiration and neat projects. Here’s some of the loveliness on her desk.

Pamela's desk

And her tower of index cards. I love all those tabs.

index card tower

One of her awesome projects to make a piece of art on a Rolodex card, every single day.

Rolodex card art

Other artists also contribute to her collection, including me (yay!). She’s been doing this for a couple of years so her collection is extensive. See her blog post for more amazing photos. All those cards represent a work of art. It’s astounding, really. It would take a pleasant period of time to go through them all. I’d love to do that some morning, along with a cup of tea.

Rolodex collection

Another of her interests is in correspondence art, and actually this is where our paths crossed. We share a love of all things postal, so of course I wanted to see art she makes, she collects, and some of the ephemera she has for creating more.

letters and glassine

postage stamp book

Here are some of the postcards she has received from all over the world.

mail call

Field Notes

Another project that is very unique is her work on altered passports. She takes an old passport and tells a story with photos and ephemera of where this person has traveled. It’s so creative! Read her description of how she comes up with the ideas on her blog. I want to create something with one of my old passports. I’m going to do some studying of these for a while first.

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She also has glue books that I found fascinating. The covers come from hardcover Reader’s Digest compilations.

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All in all, we had a wonderful time. I brought some of my journals to share so with all of our sharing we didn’t have that much time to create. That’s ok. We’re going to do it again someday ūüôā

rubber stamps

bingo cards

gummed labels

 

Before I get to the stamps I have to back up a little. Back in the middle of August, there was an antique fair in Sunnyvale, hosted by the Sunnyvale Historical Society. Since I’m now a member of that group, I had gotten the heads up that the antique fair was going to be something that I didn’t want to miss. The event was held at the Sunnyvale museum and had an area set up outside with many tables for groups to display things of interest, such as the Lace Museum having someone working on making traditional lace.

Sunnyvale lace 1

Sunnyvale lace 2

They also had a few tables set up with antiques for sale. I picked up a few things.

antiques in Sunnyvale

I got a Kodak camera from 1917 with its case for $25, a coat and hat wall hook for $4 (I just figured out where I’m going to mount it!), a hand-stitched handkerchief for 25 cents, and some neat *huge* geological survey maps for a couple of dollars total.

geological survey maps

At another set of tables was the San Jose Postcard Club and the San Jose Stamp Club. I got a neat vintage stamp for stopping by.

mint stamp

I began chatting with some of the gentlemen at the SJ Stamp Club booth and was telling them how I use old postage stamps in some of my collage art pieces. They were very interested to hear what kinds of projects I was working on and eventually invited me to one of their club meeting where I was invited to share some of my different projects. I really enjoyed that.

One of the members made available to me a huge quantity of stamps at a very low price. Many of the stamps had little to no value so letting them go in bulk was not an issue. So on another day, we arranged I would come to collect what turned out to be 4 big boxes of stamps. Some were stamps that were still backed on old bits of envelopes, but most of the stamps were loose.

boxes of stamps

box of stamps on paper

One box was entirely international. Another box was US only.

international stamps

Some stamps had been sorted and bound into small bricks.

brick stamps

Those were the cutest ones. I couldn’t resist taking a picture of just those arranged in a bowl.

bowl of stamps

In the end, there were so¬†many stamps that it was necessary to share. Thank goodness I knew the right people to contact. My friend Pamela who does correspondence art got half the stash (and she was kind enough to reimburse me for half of the modest¬†donation price I originally paid). She’s going to do amazing things with these stamps I’m sure! With my portion, I gave two-thirds¬†of that to the art department at my children’s school. The last third I kept for myself to play with. For me less is better. I easily become overwhelmed if I have too much of anything. Still, my stash is easily 500 stamps of really neat international and US stamps. I think I’m set for life with stamps!

 

Mini junk journal of postage stamps

Last week I saw a blog post by Bonnie about making a mini book from packaging of a deck of playing cards. I thought it was the cutest thing ever. A few days ago I was opening a new roll of cello tape (my kids go though so much tape I now buy it in bulk) and I was left with the little box. Hmmm, I thought. Maybe I could make this into something… .

Mini book, covers and spine

I cut down the box so that the spine remained between two covers. Then I reinforced the cardboard to make it more sturdy. I cut down to size pages of a travel book that was translated into 3 different languages. I took some pages from each language until I had 3 signatures.

3 signatures postage jj

In all I have 72 pages to embellish (12 sheets per signature = 24 sides, in 3 signatures = 72 pages). I thought that was an awful lot to take on until I realized that some of the pages I stamped with a rubber stamping looked good just like that. I didn’t need to add anything else. Other than the rubber stamping, I’ve been embellishing with vintage postage stamps and bits of pattern papers. The pages are small so I put the cap on the number of decorative elements to 3. No more than 3 things on a page.

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It’s a super cute book. I haven’t finished all the pages but I don’t mind that some are blank. I’ll add to it when I feel like it. I have a nice envelope full of vintage stamps I can still take from, so I have plenty of material to work with.